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Shroud turin dating radiocarbon

shroud turin dating radiocarbon-45

This ruled it out as the possible burial cloth that wrapped the body of Christ.

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"It was embarrassing to have to agree with them," Mr Rogers told the BBC News website."[The radiocarbon sample] has obvious painting medium, a dye and a mordant that doesn't show anywhere else," Mr Rogers explained."This stuff was manipulated - it was coloured on purpose." In the study, he analysed and compared the sample used in the 1988 tests with other samples from the famous cloth.A research paper published in Thermochimica Acta suggests the shroud is between 1,300 and 3,000 years old.The author dismisses 1988 carbon-14 dating tests which concluded that the linen sheet was a medieval fake.Vanillin is produced by the thermal decomposition of lignin, a chemical compound found in plant material such as flax.

Levels of vanillin in material such as linen fall over time.

Michael Minor, vice-president of the American Shroud of Turin Association for Research, commented: "This is the most significant news about the Shroud of Turin since the C-14 dating was announced in 1988. But [the new research] is saying that they dated the rewoven area." But since the announcement of the 1988 results, several attempts have been made to challenge the authenticity of these tests.

"The sample tested was dyed using technology that began to appear in Italy about the time the Crusaders' last bastion fell to the Mameluke Turks in AD 1291," said Mr Rogers.

These web sites are maintained by members of the Shroud Science Group: The Shroud of Turin (B. Porter) Shroud of Turin Education Project (in memory of Father Kim Dreisbach) Scientific papers (of G. Svensson) Council for Study of the Shroud of Turin (A.

The Shroud of Turin is much older than suggested by radiocarbon dating carried out in the 1980s, according to a new study in a peer-reviewed journal.

In addition to the discovery of dye, microchemical tests - which use tiny quantities of materials - provided a way to date the shroud.